For products involving safety, mechanical failure is unacceptable and must be avoided at all cost. This is particularly true for applications in aerospace and other transport systems, or bioengineering, as well as for many types of high-performance sports equipment. Therefore, extensive testing is usually needed during product development to prevent failures, for example, fracture or fatigue from occurring in service.

Ansys Granta Selector contains reliable data for a wide range of materials used in product development across all industries. Using this data early in the product design stage eliminates the need for physical testing — saving time and money. In this webinar, we will explore how the materials selection tools “Find Similar” and “Engineering Solver” now available in Ansys Granta EduPack can prevent material failure. These tools can be seen as complementary to finite element simulations to promote safe shape design.

 

11:00 AM (EST) 16:00 (GMT)

Details


Date:
December 10, 2020
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Website:
https://www.ansys.com/about-ansys/events/20-12-10-material-selection-to-avoid-mechanical-failure

Venue


Online

Presenters


Dr. Claes Fredriksson has more than 15 years’ experience teaching Materials-related subjects to undergraduate and post graduate students in Sweden, Canada, Belgium and the U.S.A, mainly in Mechanical Engineering. After gaining an MSc in Engineering Physics and PhD in Theoretical Physics he worked in both theoretical and experimental research on polymers, metals and biomaterials. He has a passion for teaching and won a grant as part of Sweden’s Excellence in Teaching Programme to enable him to teach in the U.S.A. and facilitate the cross-pollination of pedagogical approaches.


Dr. Harriet Parnell is an Education Specialist who helps to create new teaching resources. She has a degree in Biomedical Materials Science and a PhD in Materials Engineering and Materials Design, both of which she completed at the University of Nottingham, UK. She has a technical background in mid-infrared fiber-optic materials, specifically chalcogenide glasses, and their application in remote biosensing.