CES EduPack Bulletin Tips, November 2012

This month:


TIP 1. How to visualize the effect of carbon content on yield strength and elongation

When teaching students how phase transformations can affect mechanical properties, it can be helpful to provide them with a clear graphical illustration. Steels are particularly useful to explain the influence of alloying elements and the phenomena that develop during heat treatments. Carbon content is one of the most influential on the mechanical properties of steels, and the way in which they are heat treated.

CES EduPack can help students explore the influence of carbon content in the average yield strength and elongation of several commonly used annealed low carbon (in yellow), medium carbon (in green), and high carbon (in red) steels:

CES EduPack can help students explore the influence of carbon content in the average yield strength and elongation of several commonly used annealed low carbon (in yellow), medium carbon (in green), and high carbon (in red) steels:

To recreate this graphic, start a new selection project in CES EduPack, selecting from the metals in MaterialUniverse. You can further refine the materials you use with a Tree stage, selecting the appropriate high, medium, and low carbon annealed steels:

You can further refine the materials you use with a Tree stage, selecting the appropriate high, medium, and low carbon annealed steels:

You can then create a graph stage, with Yield Strength against Elongation. The default settings within CES EduPack are to represent data ranges as ellipses on the charts. However, to make it easier to see the trend, go to the Tools menu and select Options. On the Numbers tab, you can check the 'Display data ranges as average values' (click on the image to enlarge). Compare this image with the subsequent one, to see the effect of this choice.

On the Numbers tab, you can check the 'Display data ranges as average values' (click on the image to enlarge).

You can then copy the graph (by right clicking) and paste it into your lecture notes, PowerPoint slides, or a graphical editor to make further annotation (such as the blue arrow in the original figure)

You can then copy the graph (by right clicking) and paste it into your lecture notes, PowerPoint slides, or a graphical editor to make further annotation (such as the blue arrow in the original figure).

Once you have the influence of carbon content on these properties, you can build on that and actually find out how different thermal treatments affect mechanical behavior by plotting, for the same carbon content, different quench and temper options, available from the database. Leave your students to explore, and see what else they discover!


TIP 2. Accessing additional databases

You can use the CES EduPack software to browse, search, and use data from databases other than your defaults. Alternative EduPack databases can come from the following sources:

  1. Supplied with EduPack. Most installations come with several database files. On startup you are asked to "Choose Configuration". This determines which database is loaded by default.
  2. Edited or created by you or by a collaborator. The CES Constructor software allows you to edit EduPack databases or create new ones. The results can then be shared.
  3. Downloaded from the Teaching Resources site.

In the rest of this tip, we show how to download and then open one of the databases from the shared resources area. (Please note that Granta provides no warranty or support for the items in this sharing area.)

First, access Granta's Teaching Resources website. Some of the resources are available as Open Educational Resource (OER). Access to others is limited to educators teaching a course for which CES EduPack is licensed. You will need your login details. To get your details (or a reminder) contact Granta.

As an example, download and save the Amorphous metals database—a database of 45 amorphous materials generated by a research project at the University of Cambridge. Find the database and click on the link to download the ZIP file, entering your username and password when prompted.

 

Save the ZIP file on your PC. Open the ZIP file and extract the database file:

Amorphous_metals.gdb

Now open CES EduPack. Select any starting configuration.

In the top left of the screen, you will see the database settings. Click "Change...". A dialog box similar to the following will open. The exact contents will depend on your EduPack installation and the databases (if any) that you have opened previously. 

Note, this dialog allows you to change to other databases that may be available within your implementation—for example, to switch between different levels of the EduPack database, to load a different CES EduPack Edition, or the Elements database.

To access the database that we have just downloaded click "Browse..." and then find the file "Amorphous_metals.gdb" in your file system.

Now "Open" the file—the Amorphous Metals database is available for you to browse.

One interesting point about EduPack that users rarely realize is that its principles and tools can be used on any sort of data. Return to the Resource Sharing page and scroll down to "Other databases"—you will find a few alternative EduPack databases.... like the one in Tip 3...


TIP 3. A training exercise in CES EduPack: creating a map of the world

States of the world

The graphical tools in CES EduPack, combined with the excellent teaching resources available on the Teaching Resource Website, support your teaching of materials education. One fun way to get some practice in using these resources is to plot this unusual map of the world. A small step away from material properties, but an entertaining way to get to grips with how the software can plot ranges of information and how to manipulate the axes on graphs.

To make this map, you simply need to plot the latitude and longitude of the States of the World using CES EduPack. To make it a bit easier for us, Professor Alexander Wanner (University of Karlsruhe) has provided all the information you need, and plenty more, in the database he contributed to the Teaching Resource Website.

You can download his 'States of the World' database, from Granta's Teaching Resources website, as described in tip two.

You can download his 'States of the World' database, from Granta's Teaching Resources website.

Save the 'States_of_the_world.gdb' file on your machine in the location where you store your databases. As described in Tip 2, select 'choose database in CES EduPack and use the 'Browse' button to navigate to your local copy of States_of_the_world.gdb. You will then see 'Wanner's States of the World' in your list of available databases.

To make the map you need to start a new selection project and generate a custom subset that includes all the states:

To make the map you need to start a new selection project and generate a custom subset that includes all the states:

Now, simply plot a new Graph, setting the axes to Latitude and Longitude. Remember to set both axes to Linear.

Simply plot a new Graph, setting the axes to Latitude and Longitude. Remember to set both axes to Linear.

Of course, there is plenty more to the States of the World database: if offers data in areas including geography, population, economics, defense, and sports.

Download this and other databases from the Teaching Resource Website 

Interested in contributing some of your Teaching Resources? Let us know at teachingresources@grantadesign.com.

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